LIL' RED SLED : 1961 Honda C105T Trail 55 by Studio 35ive

Called it a retrofit to revive an old bike that was famous in the past, it's not really because the 1961 Honda C105T Trail 55 was almost completely rebuilt. By the sole builder in Perry Wilson's garage at Studio 35ive, who works as a photographer during the day. and use the free time from work to build on what he is passionate about.  Perry Wilson of Studio 35ive, who lives in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. He began to create this piece with 100 dollars, or about 3,400 baht, to buy a 1961 Honda C105T Trail 55 from a city dump. They are then dissected to check what is still working and what is damaged. but found that there are many absolutely unusable decided to maintain the structure of the bike renovated and design components come up by yourself With knowledge of CAD programs and using 3D printer manufacturing technology to create parts.  “I wanted a classic look and feel,” says Perry Wilson, “inspired by the scramblers and trail bikes of the era, every inch of the bike was tuned. And not a single nut from the factory was left on this piece.”  Most designers will notice that the sleek front guard and fairing have been removed, as Perry sticks to tried and true weight reduction methods to improve performance. He went above and beyond by trimming the steel frame and even cutting, welding and smoothing the connections. is as smooth as possible The rear fender is custom, which Perry uses the idea of ​​a Trail bike as the core of the design.  The headlamp assembly has been removed and replaced with a custom rack that Perry designed in CAD and 3D-printed, matching the rear rack. PLA+ is the printing component and the material is found to be extremely durable and strong. Suitable for use in modifications to the components of the bike very much.  that new handlebar obtained from mountain bikes with some modifications and after a long trial and error process He ended up with a very unified setup, the brake levers, the clutch levers being shorter. and new handlebars and bar end mirrors. Perry chose to set the controls this way for ease of use. because the engine has changed And the new transmission is a semi-automatic. To use or not use the clutch, it can go in and out of the gear normally.  The original engine that came with the bike Once the dissection was examined, Perry didn't think it was worth it. Because after more than 50 years of being parked, the engine was too much to recover to work normally. Perry decided to order a new engine from China. And it has chosen a 125cc engine and a 4-speed semi-automatic transmission with 3 forward gears and 1 reverse gear.  As for the suspension system If you look at the 60's or 70's models from Honda, you'll know that the wishbones only use chrome-plated shock absorbers, but Perry thinks out of the box differently. So new shocks were installed to make bumps on the trail smoother. and help make the bike more efficient in driving a variety of While the wheel hub is the original from the factory. But the spokes attached to it were too rusty to repair. Therefore, new spokes were ordered and installed on the old hub. And worn with Shinko SR241 tires in the form of All-Terrain tires that are ready to go on all surfaces.  The creamy red dress was spray-painted by Jeff Painter of Naples, Florida, as well as a hand-painted pattern on the tank by Bryson Lunger, and the brown leather seats are hand-stitched and single-piece. the only one in the world In the side of the bag Obtained from a trekking shop, Perry has designed the mount and 3D-printed it so it can be mounted on the bike.  Perry Wilson concludes by saying: I want this bike to be an example of the idea that you don't have to be a big store or a designer to create something unique. This is everyone's bike, it's cheap, fun, reliable, and it was made by a normal person like me, so anyone can build it. with innovations that are easily accessible today

Called it a retrofit to revive an old bike that was famous in the past, it's not really because the 1961 Honda C105T Trail 55 was almost completely rebuilt. By the sole builder in Perry Wilson's garage at Studio 35ive, who works as a photographer during the day. and use the free time from work to build on what he is passionate about.

Called it a retrofit to revive an old bike that was famous in the past, it's not really because the 1961 Honda C105T Trail 55 was almost completely rebuilt. By the sole builder in Perry Wilson's garage at Studio 35ive, who works as a photographer during the day. and use the free time from work to build on what he is passionate about.  Perry Wilson of Studio 35ive, who lives in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. He began to create this piece with 100 dollars, or about 3,400 baht, to buy a 1961 Honda C105T Trail 55 from a city dump. They are then dissected to check what is still working and what is damaged. but found that there are many absolutely unusable decided to maintain the structure of the bike renovated and design components come up by yourself With knowledge of CAD programs and using 3D printer manufacturing technology to create parts.  “I wanted a classic look and feel,” says Perry Wilson, “inspired by the scramblers and trail bikes of the era, every inch of the bike was tuned. And not a single nut from the factory was left on this piece.”  Most designers will notice that the sleek front guard and fairing have been removed, as Perry sticks to tried and true weight reduction methods to improve performance. He went above and beyond by trimming the steel frame and even cutting, welding and smoothing the connections. is as smooth as possible The rear fender is custom, which Perry uses the idea of ​​a Trail bike as the core of the design.  The headlamp assembly has been removed and replaced with a custom rack that Perry designed in CAD and 3D-printed, matching the rear rack. PLA+ is the printing component and the material is found to be extremely durable and strong. Suitable for use in modifications to the components of the bike very much.  that new handlebar obtained from mountain bikes with some modifications and after a long trial and error process He ended up with a very unified setup, the brake levers, the clutch levers being shorter. and new handlebars and bar end mirrors. Perry chose to set the controls this way for ease of use. because the engine has changed And the new transmission is a semi-automatic. To use or not use the clutch, it can go in and out of the gear normally.  The original engine that came with the bike Once the dissection was examined, Perry didn't think it was worth it. Because after more than 50 years of being parked, the engine was too much to recover to work normally. Perry decided to order a new engine from China. And it has chosen a 125cc engine and a 4-speed semi-automatic transmission with 3 forward gears and 1 reverse gear.  As for the suspension system If you look at the 60's or 70's models from Honda, you'll know that the wishbones only use chrome-plated shock absorbers, but Perry thinks out of the box differently. So new shocks were installed to make bumps on the trail smoother. and help make the bike more efficient in driving a variety of While the wheel hub is the original from the factory. But the spokes attached to it were too rusty to repair. Therefore, new spokes were ordered and installed on the old hub. And worn with Shinko SR241 tires in the form of All-Terrain tires that are ready to go on all surfaces.  The creamy red dress was spray-painted by Jeff Painter of Naples, Florida, as well as a hand-painted pattern on the tank by Bryson Lunger, and the brown leather seats are hand-stitched and single-piece. the only one in the world In the side of the bag Obtained from a trekking shop, Perry has designed the mount and 3D-printed it so it can be mounted on the bike.  Perry Wilson concludes by saying: I want this bike to be an example of the idea that you don't have to be a big store or a designer to create something unique. This is everyone's bike, it's cheap, fun, reliable, and it was made by a normal person like me, so anyone can build it. with innovations that are easily accessible today

Perry Wilson of Studio 35ive, who lives in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. He began to create this piece with 100 dollars, or about 3,400 baht, to buy a 1961 Honda C105T Trail 55 from a city dump. They are then dissected to check what is still working and what is damaged. but found that there are many absolutely unusable decided to maintain the structure of the bike renovated and design components come up by yourself With knowledge of CAD programs and using 3D printer manufacturing technology to create parts.

“I wanted a classic look and feel,” says Perry Wilson, “inspired by the scramblers and trail bikes of the era, every inch of the bike was tuned. And not a single nut from the factory was left on this piece.”

Called it a retrofit to revive an old bike that was famous in the past, it's not really because the 1961 Honda C105T Trail 55 was almost completely rebuilt. By the sole builder in Perry Wilson's garage at Studio 35ive, who works as a photographer during the day. and use the free time from work to build on what he is passionate about.  Perry Wilson of Studio 35ive, who lives in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. He began to create this piece with 100 dollars, or about 3,400 baht, to buy a 1961 Honda C105T Trail 55 from a city dump. They are then dissected to check what is still working and what is damaged. but found that there are many absolutely unusable decided to maintain the structure of the bike renovated and design components come up by yourself With knowledge of CAD programs and using 3D printer manufacturing technology to create parts.  “I wanted a classic look and feel,” says Perry Wilson, “inspired by the scramblers and trail bikes of the era, every inch of the bike was tuned. And not a single nut from the factory was left on this piece.”  Most designers will notice that the sleek front guard and fairing have been removed, as Perry sticks to tried and true weight reduction methods to improve performance. He went above and beyond by trimming the steel frame and even cutting, welding and smoothing the connections. is as smooth as possible The rear fender is custom, which Perry uses the idea of ​​a Trail bike as the core of the design.  The headlamp assembly has been removed and replaced with a custom rack that Perry designed in CAD and 3D-printed, matching the rear rack. PLA+ is the printing component and the material is found to be extremely durable and strong. Suitable for use in modifications to the components of the bike very much.  that new handlebar obtained from mountain bikes with some modifications and after a long trial and error process He ended up with a very unified setup, the brake levers, the clutch levers being shorter. and new handlebars and bar end mirrors. Perry chose to set the controls this way for ease of use. because the engine has changed And the new transmission is a semi-automatic. To use or not use the clutch, it can go in and out of the gear normally.  The original engine that came with the bike Once the dissection was examined, Perry didn't think it was worth it. Because after more than 50 years of being parked, the engine was too much to recover to work normally. Perry decided to order a new engine from China. And it has chosen a 125cc engine and a 4-speed semi-automatic transmission with 3 forward gears and 1 reverse gear.  As for the suspension system If you look at the 60's or 70's models from Honda, you'll know that the wishbones only use chrome-plated shock absorbers, but Perry thinks out of the box differently. So new shocks were installed to make bumps on the trail smoother. and help make the bike more efficient in driving a variety of While the wheel hub is the original from the factory. But the spokes attached to it were too rusty to repair. Therefore, new spokes were ordered and installed on the old hub. And worn with Shinko SR241 tires in the form of All-Terrain tires that are ready to go on all surfaces.  The creamy red dress was spray-painted by Jeff Painter of Naples, Florida, as well as a hand-painted pattern on the tank by Bryson Lunger, and the brown leather seats are hand-stitched and single-piece. the only one in the world In the side of the bag Obtained from a trekking shop, Perry has designed the mount and 3D-printed it so it can be mounted on the bike.  Perry Wilson concludes by saying: I want this bike to be an example of the idea that you don't have to be a big store or a designer to create something unique. This is everyone's bike, it's cheap, fun, reliable, and it was made by a normal person like me, so anyone can build it. with innovations that are easily accessible today

Most designers will notice that the sleek front guard and fairing have been removed, as Perry sticks to tried and true weight reduction methods to improve performance. He went above and beyond by trimming the steel frame and even cutting, welding and smoothing the connections. is as smooth as possible The rear fender is custom, which Perry uses the idea of ​​a Trail bike as the core of the design.

The headlamp assembly has been removed and replaced with a custom rack that Perry designed in CAD and 3D-printed, matching the rear rack. PLA+ is the printing component and the material is found to be extremely durable and strong. Suitable for use in modifications to the components of the bike very much.

that new handlebar obtained from mountain bikes with some modifications and after a long trial and error process He ended up with a very unified setup, the brake levers, the clutch levers being shorter. and new handlebars and bar end mirrors. Perry chose to set the controls this way for ease of use. because the engine has changed And the new transmission is a semi-automatic. To use or not use the clutch, it can go in and out of the gear normally.

Called it a retrofit to revive an old bike that was famous in the past, it's not really because the 1961 Honda C105T Trail 55 was almost completely rebuilt. By the sole builder in Perry Wilson's garage at Studio 35ive, who works as a photographer during the day. and use the free time from work to build on what he is passionate about.  Perry Wilson of Studio 35ive, who lives in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. He began to create this piece with 100 dollars, or about 3,400 baht, to buy a 1961 Honda C105T Trail 55 from a city dump. They are then dissected to check what is still working and what is damaged. but found that there are many absolutely unusable decided to maintain the structure of the bike renovated and design components come up by yourself With knowledge of CAD programs and using 3D printer manufacturing technology to create parts.  “I wanted a classic look and feel,” says Perry Wilson, “inspired by the scramblers and trail bikes of the era, every inch of the bike was tuned. And not a single nut from the factory was left on this piece.”  Most designers will notice that the sleek front guard and fairing have been removed, as Perry sticks to tried and true weight reduction methods to improve performance. He went above and beyond by trimming the steel frame and even cutting, welding and smoothing the connections. is as smooth as possible The rear fender is custom, which Perry uses the idea of ​​a Trail bike as the core of the design.  The headlamp assembly has been removed and replaced with a custom rack that Perry designed in CAD and 3D-printed, matching the rear rack. PLA+ is the printing component and the material is found to be extremely durable and strong. Suitable for use in modifications to the components of the bike very much.  that new handlebar obtained from mountain bikes with some modifications and after a long trial and error process He ended up with a very unified setup, the brake levers, the clutch levers being shorter. and new handlebars and bar end mirrors. Perry chose to set the controls this way for ease of use. because the engine has changed And the new transmission is a semi-automatic. To use or not use the clutch, it can go in and out of the gear normally.  The original engine that came with the bike Once the dissection was examined, Perry didn't think it was worth it. Because after more than 50 years of being parked, the engine was too much to recover to work normally. Perry decided to order a new engine from China. And it has chosen a 125cc engine and a 4-speed semi-automatic transmission with 3 forward gears and 1 reverse gear.  As for the suspension system If you look at the 60's or 70's models from Honda, you'll know that the wishbones only use chrome-plated shock absorbers, but Perry thinks out of the box differently. So new shocks were installed to make bumps on the trail smoother. and help make the bike more efficient in driving a variety of While the wheel hub is the original from the factory. But the spokes attached to it were too rusty to repair. Therefore, new spokes were ordered and installed on the old hub. And worn with Shinko SR241 tires in the form of All-Terrain tires that are ready to go on all surfaces.  The creamy red dress was spray-painted by Jeff Painter of Naples, Florida, as well as a hand-painted pattern on the tank by Bryson Lunger, and the brown leather seats are hand-stitched and single-piece. the only one in the world In the side of the bag Obtained from a trekking shop, Perry has designed the mount and 3D-printed it so it can be mounted on the bike.  Perry Wilson concludes by saying: I want this bike to be an example of the idea that you don't have to be a big store or a designer to create something unique. This is everyone's bike, it's cheap, fun, reliable, and it was made by a normal person like me, so anyone can build it. with innovations that are easily accessible today

The original engine that came with the bike Once the dissection was examined, Perry didn't think it was worth it. Because after more than 50 years of being parked, the engine was too much to recover to work normally. Perry decided to order a new engine from China. And it has chosen a 125cc engine and a 4-speed semi-automatic transmission with 3 forward gears and 1 reverse gear.

As for the suspension system If you look at the 60's or 70's models from Honda, you'll know that the wishbones only use chrome-plated shock absorbers, but Perry thinks out of the box differently. So new shocks were installed to make bumps on the trail smoother. and help make the bike more efficient in driving a variety of While the wheel hub is the original from the factory. But the spokes attached to it were too rusty to repair. Therefore, new spokes were ordered and installed on the old hub. And worn with Shinko SR241 tires in the form of All-Terrain tires that are ready to go on all surfaces.

Called it a retrofit to revive an old bike that was famous in the past, it's not really because the 1961 Honda C105T Trail 55 was almost completely rebuilt. By the sole builder in Perry Wilson's garage at Studio 35ive, who works as a photographer during the day. and use the free time from work to build on what he is passionate about.  Perry Wilson of Studio 35ive, who lives in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. He began to create this piece with 100 dollars, or about 3,400 baht, to buy a 1961 Honda C105T Trail 55 from a city dump. They are then dissected to check what is still working and what is damaged. but found that there are many absolutely unusable decided to maintain the structure of the bike renovated and design components come up by yourself With knowledge of CAD programs and using 3D printer manufacturing technology to create parts.  “I wanted a classic look and feel,” says Perry Wilson, “inspired by the scramblers and trail bikes of the era, every inch of the bike was tuned. And not a single nut from the factory was left on this piece.”  Most designers will notice that the sleek front guard and fairing have been removed, as Perry sticks to tried and true weight reduction methods to improve performance. He went above and beyond by trimming the steel frame and even cutting, welding and smoothing the connections. is as smooth as possible The rear fender is custom, which Perry uses the idea of ​​a Trail bike as the core of the design.  The headlamp assembly has been removed and replaced with a custom rack that Perry designed in CAD and 3D-printed, matching the rear rack. PLA+ is the printing component and the material is found to be extremely durable and strong. Suitable for use in modifications to the components of the bike very much.  that new handlebar obtained from mountain bikes with some modifications and after a long trial and error process He ended up with a very unified setup, the brake levers, the clutch levers being shorter. and new handlebars and bar end mirrors. Perry chose to set the controls this way for ease of use. because the engine has changed And the new transmission is a semi-automatic. To use or not use the clutch, it can go in and out of the gear normally.  The original engine that came with the bike Once the dissection was examined, Perry didn't think it was worth it. Because after more than 50 years of being parked, the engine was too much to recover to work normally. Perry decided to order a new engine from China. And it has chosen a 125cc engine and a 4-speed semi-automatic transmission with 3 forward gears and 1 reverse gear.  As for the suspension system If you look at the 60's or 70's models from Honda, you'll know that the wishbones only use chrome-plated shock absorbers, but Perry thinks out of the box differently. So new shocks were installed to make bumps on the trail smoother. and help make the bike more efficient in driving a variety of While the wheel hub is the original from the factory. But the spokes attached to it were too rusty to repair. Therefore, new spokes were ordered and installed on the old hub. And worn with Shinko SR241 tires in the form of All-Terrain tires that are ready to go on all surfaces.  The creamy red dress was spray-painted by Jeff Painter of Naples, Florida, as well as a hand-painted pattern on the tank by Bryson Lunger, and the brown leather seats are hand-stitched and single-piece. the only one in the world In the side of the bag Obtained from a trekking shop, Perry has designed the mount and 3D-printed it so it can be mounted on the bike.  Perry Wilson concludes by saying: I want this bike to be an example of the idea that you don't have to be a big store or a designer to create something unique. This is everyone's bike, it's cheap, fun, reliable, and it was made by a normal person like me, so anyone can build it. with innovations that are easily accessible today

The creamy red dress was spray-painted by Jeff Painter of Naples, Florida, as well as a hand-painted pattern on the tank by Bryson Lunger, and the brown leather seats are hand-stitched and single-piece. the only one in the world In the side of the bag Obtained from a trekking shop, Perry has designed the mount and 3D-printed it so it can be mounted on the bike.

Perry Wilson concludes by saying: I want this bike to be an example of the idea that you don't have to be a big store or a designer to create something unique. This is everyone's bike, it's cheap, fun, reliable, and it was made by a normal person like me, so anyone can build it. with innovations that are easily accessible today

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