This 1967 Ford Falcon Club Wagon what it's like to go low in the ground

Few automotive subcultures have some sort of reliable car. For example, a crowd of truckers would consider the Mazda MX-5 or E363 series. The Lowrider, on the other hand, is default for classic GMB bodies or G bodies such as Chevrolet Impala or Buick Regal. Of course, some people like to start with something completely different.  In the case of Gary Villagient, he wanted to create another kind of lowrider. He decided to upgrade to the 1967 Ford Econoline Falcon Club Wagon instead of the regular platform. Villagiant, called the Van Slam, bought an abandoned van and turned it into a vehicle that won the show.  Villagient said it all started when he found a van sitting on the street and asked the owner if he wanted to get rid of it. The owner said he would start building this unique item and let it go for $ 1,000. A few days after taking over the Club Wagon, Villagiante began working on it, initially planning to leave it in place. But Tyler Pullen, his friend at the TP Custom Chop Shop, convinced him to do it another way.  The result is a green paint with unique patterns, colors and pinstripes. From the side panels to the interior decoration of the seats, the interior is also green. Villagiante also drilled a large hole in the roof to expose the van to more sunlight. Next, there's an air suspension that allows this van to sit as low off the ground as possible.  The last important thing is to replace the engine. This van no longer uses the inline 6-cylinder option introduced in the 1960s. Instead, the Econoline's 4.8-liter V8 engine is the Chevrolet Express Van. The owners believe it will produce around 300 horsepower.  Vans have been a hit in the custom car scene in recent years. Some of the awards he has garnered over the years include the 2020 Grand National Roadster Show and the 2020 Sacramento Autorama. What Villagiente wanted to show was that he was able to turn a van into a clear Lowrider which is a great achievement. .

Few automotive subcultures have some sort of reliable car. For example, a crowd of truckers would consider the Mazda MX-5 or E363 series. The Lowrider, on the other hand, is default for classic GMB bodies or G bodies such as Chevrolet Impala or Buick Regal. Of course, some people like to start with something completely different.

In the case of Gary Villagient, he wanted to create another kind of lowrider. He decided to upgrade to the 1967 Ford Econoline Falcon Club Wagon instead of the regular platform. Villagiant, called the Van Slam, bought an abandoned van and turned it into a vehicle that won the show.

Villagient said it all started when he found a van sitting on the street and asked the owner if he wanted to get rid of it. The owner said he would start building this unique item and let it go for $ 1,000. A few days after taking over the Club Wagon, Villagiante began working on it, initially planning to leave it in place. But Tyler Pullen, his friend at the TP Custom Chop Shop, convinced him to do it another way.

The result is a green paint with unique patterns, colors and pinstripes. From the side panels to the interior decoration of the seats, the interior is also green. Villagiante also drilled a large hole in the roof to expose the van to more sunlight. Next, there's an air suspension that allows this van to sit as low off the ground as possible.

The last important thing is to replace the engine. This van no longer uses the inline 6-cylinder option introduced in the 1960s. Instead, the Econoline's 4.8-liter V8 engine is the Chevrolet Express Van. The owners believe it will produce around 300 horsepower.

Vans have been a hit in the custom car scene in recent years. Some of the awards he has garnered over the years include the 2020 Grand National Roadster Show and the 2020 Sacramento Autorama. What Villagiente wanted to show was that he was able to turn a van into a clear Lowrider which is a great achievement. .

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