IIHS introduces a new driver monitoring test for assist systems

The Highway Safety Insurance Association has revealed another test to be performed in the new test car as part of the safety test battery. This is an assessment program aimed at evaluating a partially automated vehicle to determine its safety in use. Like their Crash test, IIHS Specify a good, acceptable, limit or bad rating.

These new assessments apply to systems such as: GM's Supercruise, Ford's Blue Cruise with Tesla autopilot .. Of course, there are other systems and IIHS will test them as well. The IIHS has already tested forward collision warnings and automatic emergencies. Brake system, however, uses a different classification system.

In order to receive the highest "good" score in these tests, IIHS stresses the need for a good driver monitoring system. You need to be able to "make sure the driver's eyes are on the road and that the driver's hand is always on the wheel or ready to grab it." Many driver monitoring systems are already quite effective at tracking the driver's eyes and can detect when the driver's hand is on the steering wheel, but track the position of the hand when it is away from the steering wheel. 

What you do is new. In theory, if a manufacturer wants to deliver a true hands-free system that passes the IIHS test, they will need a new suite of sensors to accurately track the driver's hand against the steering wheel.

In addition, vehicles rated "good" have different types of increasing alerts to grab the driver's attention if surveillance reveals that they are not paying attention. Examples of acceptable alerts include beeps, vibrations, and pulses. break Pull the driver's seat belt.

 If neither alarm remedies the driver's negligence, the vehicle will stop or crawl with the vehicle in a safety procedure, alert the manufacturer's doorman, and call emergency services if necessary. The IIHS also states that after an alert escalation, the driver must be excluded from the partially automated system until the engine is turned off and then on again.

The Highway Safety Insurance Association has revealed another test to be performed in the new test car as part of the safety test battery. This is an assessment program aimed at evaluating a partially automated vehicle to determine its safety in use. Like their Crash test, IIHS Specify a good, acceptable, limit or bad rating.  These new assessments apply to systems such as: GM's Supercruise, Ford's Blue Cruise with Tesla autopilot .. Of course, there are other systems and IIHS will test them as well. The IIHS has already tested forward collision warnings and automatic emergencies. Brake system, however, uses a different classification system.  In order to receive the highest "good" score in these tests, IIHS stresses the need for a good driver monitoring system. You need to be able to "make sure the driver's eyes are on the road and that the driver's hand is always on the wheel or ready to grab it." Many driver monitoring systems are already quite effective at tracking the driver's eyes and can detect when the driver's hand is on the steering wheel, but track the position of the hand when it is away from the steering wheel. What you do is new. In theory, if a manufacturer wants to deliver a true hands-free system that passes the IIHS test, they will need a new suite of sensors to accurately track the driver's hand against the steering wheel.  In addition, vehicles rated "good" have different types of increasing alerts to grab the driver's attention if surveillance reveals that they are not paying attention. Examples of acceptable alerts include beeps, vibrations, and pulses. break Pull the driver's seat belt. If neither alarm remedies the driver's negligence, the vehicle will stop or crawl with the vehicle in a safety procedure, alert the manufacturer's doorman, and call emergency services if necessary. The IIHS also states that after an alert escalation, the driver must be excluded from the partially automated system until the engine is turned off and then on again.       Next, there are indications on lane change. To get a "good" rating, the car should only make a lane change when started by the driver. For example, activate the left turn signal to instruct the car to move into the left lane. Additionally, adaptive cruise control should be designed so that traffic ahead takes the vehicle to an extended stop and does not reactivate even if the driver is not looking at the road.  The list of IIHS requirements continues. Due to its 'good' rating, the lane center maintenance system does not have to be designed to be inactive when the driver is involved, this is because the IIHS does not want the driver to turn off the system. Say to discourage correction. It should also be designed so that the system does not function when the driver's seat belt is removed or when automatic emergency braking or lane departure prevention is disabled.  This is a long list of IIHS requirements and if a manufacturer wants to get a "good" rating, there seems to be something they can do. Ultimately, I think it's good to have a unified third-party rating system that helps consumers differentiate between different systems and clearly distinguish between what they can and can't do.  To this end, IIHS says in an unnamed call that it can only be addressed to one manufacturer: Tesla.  "Until now, even state-of-the-art systems require active driver monitoring," says IIHS. “But some manufacturers have oversold the functionality of the system and treat the system as if the driver could drive the car himself. In the worst case, the driver watches the video on his mobile. It is recorded that you play, take a nap, and so on. Speed ​​violation Get off the highway. "  The IIHS did not disclose the exact time due to a delay in testing due to a shortage of vehicles, but the first round of assessments will be released at some point in 2022.

Next, there are indications on lane change. To get a "good" rating, the car should only make a lane change when started by the driver. For example, activate the left turn signal to instruct the car to move into the left lane. Additionally, adaptive cruise control should be designed so that traffic ahead takes the vehicle to an extended stop and does not reactivate even if the driver is not looking at the road.

The list of IIHS requirements continues. Due to its 'good' rating, the lane center maintenance system does not have to be designed to be inactive when the driver is involved, this is because the IIHS does not want the driver to turn off the system. Say to discourage correction. 

It should also be designed so that the system does not function when the driver's seat belt is removed or when automatic emergency braking or lane departure prevention is disabled.

This is a long list of IIHS requirements and if a manufacturer wants to get a "good" rating, there seems to be something they can do. Ultimately, I think it's good to have a unified third-party rating system that helps consumers differentiate between different systems and clearly distinguish between what they can and can't do.

To this end, IIHS says in an unnamed call that it can only be addressed to one manufacturer: Tesla.

"Until now, even state-of-the-art systems require active driver monitoring," says IIHS. “But some manufacturers have oversold the functionality of the system and treat the system as if the driver could drive the car himself. In the worst case, the driver watches the video on his mobile. It is recorded that you play, take a nap, and so on. Speed ​​violation Get off the highway. "

The IIHS did not disclose the exact time due to a delay in testing due to a shortage of vehicles, but the first round of assessments will be released at some point in 2022.

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