Head of NTSB at Fed Agency: Stop using misleading data

On Tuesday, Homendy responded to other security groups, notably stating that NHTSA's continued use of the data departs from the broader approach currently required. In a letter to Butigue last month, Highway and Car Safety Defenders, the Consumer Federation of America, Japan Safe Driving Center, stressed the need for a multi-pronged plan to reduce accidents, including long-delayed safety standards imposed. from Congress. supervise self-distribution more closely. - Driving a car on the road.     Continuing to use 94% of the data points, they are working to implement a secure systems approach that "ignores the complexity of collisions and examines how every aspect of the transport environment contributes to collisions."  And in the personal safety roadmap released Tuesday, highway and auto safety advocates point to an increase in collisions between electric vehicles, citing them as one of the biggest dangers on the road due to insufficient safety. I did it  The government has made great efforts to improve the safety of all road users. President Joe Biden's $ 1 Trillion Infrastructure Act, for example, NTSB aims to reduce the effects of human error and protect people walking, cycling, or driving.  Under the law, approximately $ 5 billion will go to the government's new Safe Streets and Roads for All program, which will fund cities, metropolitan areas and towns, particularly to improve the safety of cyclists and pedestrians. Growth. It also includes new federal government obligations for automakers to introduce anti-drink driving technology into their vehicles.  Homendy is "cautiously optimistic" that the department is taking steps to increase safety, such as improving data collection to determine when and why the incident occurred. where it went. But what worries him most is the government's ability to maximize the use of rapidly changing technology to keep people safe, he said.  "I'm very clear about this when I think there are security issues and where people are dying," he said. "And you know it's a duty, and I take it very seriously ... Whether it's DOT or NTSB, do we work as hard as possible? We should be."

Washington - As traffic accidents rise, the best of the US Safety investigators say 94% of serious accidents are caused entirely by driver errors and the Department of Transportation should stop using them. It summarizes the widely quoted government figures.

Jennifer Homendy, the Biden administration's National Transportation Safety Board, was surprised that the word remained on the department's website, she told The Associated Press Tuesday. You decide to adopt a comprehensive strategy to prevent collisions through better road design, car safety actions and other measures.

Automobile safety advocates have called on the department to stop using the statistics for many years. This includes Homendy's requests in recent months and a letter from the Automobile Safety Group last month to Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg. They call that number an unacceptable "excuse" for the increase in accidents. In the section promoting the safety of self-driving cars, the National Highway Traffic Safety Bureau's website "94% of serious accidents are due to human error," he said.

"This has to change," Homendy said. Continuous access to NHTSA statistics. "it's dangerous."

You said the public should be angry at the deaths of around 40,000 people every year. Road accidents have injured millions of people, but rather they see it as a "risk to people".

"What's happening is that there is a culture that accepts it," she said.

"At the same time, we all absolve ourselves of the responsibility to improve safety. Dot," she added, referring to the transport ministry. "We cannot say that we are focusing on a 'safe system' approach," she said. Eh. Make sure everyone who shares traffic safety responsibilities are taking steps to eliminate deaths and serious injuries ... - and the numbers are 94%. It is not accurate. ,

In response, NHTSA announced Tuesday that it will update the wording of its Web site in the near future, "to address data characteristics and provide additional information." Next week, the ministry will announce a national strategy on measures to save lives on the road.

This figure shows an NHTSA reminder in 2015, they claimed that "the last accident in the series as significant as the cause of the accident was assigned to the driver in 94% of accidents." However, the note also includes a warning that the "significant cause" "is not intended to be construed as the cause of the accident", indicating other important factors.

Subsequently, state transportation agencies and departments led by Elaine Chao wrote a note that 94% of serious accidents were found to be "human error" which promotes the development of self-driving cars. Rice fields.

The number of road accidents has skyrocketed in recent years, especially during the coronavirus pandemic. The number of road accidents in the United States in the first half of 2021 reached 20,160 in the first half since 2006. That number has increased by 18.4% since the first half of 2020 and the administration has launched a global strategy.

The NHTSA attributed road deaths to road deaths in 2019 and other reckless driving behaviors to increased speed violations. Previously, the death toll had fallen for the third consecutive year.

On Tuesday, Homendy responded to other security groups, notably stating that NHTSA's continued use of the data departs from the broader approach currently required. In a letter to Butigue last month, Highway and Car Safety Defenders, the Consumer Federation of America, Japan Safe Driving Center, stressed the need for a multi-pronged plan to reduce accidents, including long-delayed safety standards imposed. from Congress. supervise self-distribution more closely. - Driving a car on the road.

Continuing to use 94% of the data points, they are working to implement a secure systems approach that "ignores the complexity of collisions and examines how every aspect of the transport environment contributes to collisions."

And in the personal safety roadmap released Tuesday, highway and auto safety advocates point to an increase in collisions between electric vehicles, citing them as one of the biggest dangers on the road due to insufficient safety. I did it

The government has made great efforts to improve the safety of all road users. President Joe Biden's $ 1 Trillion Infrastructure Act, for example, NTSB aims to reduce the effects of human error and protect people walking, cycling, or driving.

Under the law, approximately $ 5 billion will go to the government's new Safe Streets and Roads for All program, which will fund cities, metropolitan areas and towns, particularly to improve the safety of cyclists and pedestrians. Growth. It also includes new federal government obligations for automakers to introduce anti-drink driving technology into their vehicles.

Homendy is "cautiously optimistic" that the department is taking steps to increase safety, such as improving data collection to determine when and why the incident occurred. where it went. But what worries him most is the government's ability to maximize the use of rapidly changing technology to keep people safe, he said.

"I'm very clear about this when I think there are security issues and where people are dying," he said. "And you know it's a duty, and I take it very seriously ... Whether it's DOT or NTSB, do we work as hard as possible? We should be."

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