Apple Car rumors prompt Korean battery makers to form a task force

Apple Car rumors just won't die, and maybe there's a truth living somewhere. At least that's what it looks like based on a report published on Wednesday by 9 to 5 Mac, which claims that South Korean battery manufacturers have formed an Apple Car task force.  The idea of a multicorporation task force being formed to court Apple's business is gutsy, but it may not be without its merits. See, word 'round the campfire is that Apple has had visits with several battery suppliers in the last month, presumably with the goal of locking down a supplier for a pack of its own design.

Following a visit by Apple executives to Korea, several suppliers formed the Apple Car Task Force. The news hints that the tech giant is getting even closer to making its self-driving vehicle a reality. The Apple Cars working group would seem to make this project more than just rumors and speculation.

Meeting with Manufacturers of Electronic Parts

According to Korea IT News, Apple visited South Korea in December 2021 with a special focus on vehicle batteries. Instead of using existing battery systems, the company wants custom-designed solutions. This is the second time we know that Apple will travel to South Korea to discuss the development and production of the Apple Car.

The visit sparked a "war to enter Apple's 'Apple Car' autonomous electric vehicle supply chain management (SCM)." Vendor selection is expected to be finalized sometime within 2022, after which full-scale development will begin.

According to the report, Cupertino wants to be very hands-on with the battery design. Obviously, Apple wants to outsource the manufacturing of the battery system, but it also wants to develop and manage the components directly.

Apple Cars task force offers encouraging news

It seems that all the news about Project Titan has been negative lately. Cupertino has lost one senior engineer after another, including engineering manager for battery systems Alex Clarabut.

However, we see more about the output of the project than we do ourselves. This may be because it is quite easy to see when a person is leaving a particular company. On the other hand, it is more challenging to select several new employees from many other sources.

South Korea's workforce report is certainly encouraging. Even more encouraging is the prospect of Cupertino actually investing in its chosen supplier to help increase production capacity.

According to the industry, Apple paid serious attention to the proposed equity investment in one of the domestic manufacturers of electronic components. It also sought to double the company's electronic parts production capacity. It is unknown if the company that received the offer accepted Apple's offer.

If this is true, and if the chosen manufacturers accept the offer, it would certainly indicate that the project is something that Apple intends to bring to market. Cupertino tends to be very savvy in its acquisitions and is unlikely to buy a stake in the company if there is no profit from its products.

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