Forgotten Concept - Rover TCV Concept 2002

Whenever we hear a leader admit that some role model literally saved their company's life, we can't help but think of all the times things haven't gone so well.  Could historic brands that more or less recently disappeared, such as Rover, a true British icon with more than 100 years of history, could have been saved by a single car? If the answer is yes, then thinking back to the years when the British brand went out of business, this car should be an SUV . In fact, shortly before the shutdown, Rover had studied one, presented in prototype form at the 2002 Geneva Motor Show under the name TCV .  Born to be versatile TCV stood for  Tourer Concept Vehicle , nothing very original to us today, but back then that's what the first SUVs looked like. The design was the work of Peter Stevens  who, after working on famous models such as the McLaren F1 and the latest evolution of the Lotus Esprit, had become the style director of Rover, designing the latest models of the 25 and the 45 to the all-new 75, and its sporty MG variants.  The TCV line was distinguished, however, by the abundance of edges and flat surfaces which hinted at the future stylistic orientation of the brand. The main feature of the car was therefore quite different: versatility, to which the company valued so much that at the Rover stand in Geneva the concept was presented with a washing machine placed in the trunk to show how spacious it was .  The interior has, in fact, been designed with a special floor that can be lowered at the rear to optimize volume and facilitate loading, while all seats can be folded except the driver's seat.  This freed up a space 3 meters long and an area comparable to that of a small van. It is also possible to install fixed sofas and various other accessories at fixing points in the floor, thus transforming the cabin into a living room.  Under the hood, a V6 The mechanics were taken from production models and were not so revolutionary. It was based on the engine of the 75 with the V6 2.5 L.  The chassis of the 75, developed during the period when Rover was owned by BMW (from 1994 to 2000), was intended for a four-wheel drive transmission.  A bitter epilogue Unfortunately, this project, like that of the beautiful 75 Coupé presented the same year, effectively marked the end of the brand's activity, even if in Geneva, the leaders of the MG Rover group even risked announcing that the TCV would soon be the first model of a new range arriving in 2004, which never happened.   Sources said the project also presented critical "legal" issues, as Ford, which bought Land Rover from BMW in 2000, allegedly banned MG Rover from building all-terrain vehicles to avoid confusion and overlap with the brand. .  For the same reason, in 2005, after the bankruptcy of MG Rover, the American giant rushed to acquire the exploitation rights of the Rover brand in order to prevent anyone from using it, thus decreeing its permanent abolition.

Whenever we hear a leader admit that some role model literally saved their company's life, we can't help but think of all the times things haven't gone so well.

Could historic brands that more or less recently disappeared, such as Rover, a true British icon with more than 100 years of history, could have been saved by a single car? If the answer is yes, then thinking back to the years when the British brand went out of business, this car should be an SUV . In fact, shortly before the shutdown, Rover had studied one, presented in prototype form at the 2002 Geneva Motor Show under the name TCV .

Born to be versatile

TCV stood for  Tourer Concept Vehicle , nothing very original to us today, but back then that's what the first SUVs looked like. The design was the work of Peter Stevens  who, after working on famous models such as the McLaren F1 and the latest evolution of the Lotus Esprit, had become the style director of Rover, designing the latest models of the 25 and the 45 to the all-new 75, and its sporty MG variants.

Whenever we hear a leader admit that some role model literally saved their company's life, we can't help but think of all the times things haven't gone so well.  Could historic brands that more or less recently disappeared, such as Rover, a true British icon with more than 100 years of history, could have been saved by a single car? If the answer is yes, then thinking back to the years when the British brand went out of business, this car should be an SUV . In fact, shortly before the shutdown, Rover had studied one, presented in prototype form at the 2002 Geneva Motor Show under the name TCV .  Born to be versatile TCV stood for  Tourer Concept Vehicle , nothing very original to us today, but back then that's what the first SUVs looked like. The design was the work of Peter Stevens  who, after working on famous models such as the McLaren F1 and the latest evolution of the Lotus Esprit, had become the style director of Rover, designing the latest models of the 25 and the 45 to the all-new 75, and its sporty MG variants.  The TCV line was distinguished, however, by the abundance of edges and flat surfaces which hinted at the future stylistic orientation of the brand. The main feature of the car was therefore quite different: versatility, to which the company valued so much that at the Rover stand in Geneva the concept was presented with a washing machine placed in the trunk to show how spacious it was .  The interior has, in fact, been designed with a special floor that can be lowered at the rear to optimize volume and facilitate loading, while all seats can be folded except the driver's seat.  This freed up a space 3 meters long and an area comparable to that of a small van. It is also possible to install fixed sofas and various other accessories at fixing points in the floor, thus transforming the cabin into a living room.  Under the hood, a V6 The mechanics were taken from production models and were not so revolutionary. It was based on the engine of the 75 with the V6 2.5 L.  The chassis of the 75, developed during the period when Rover was owned by BMW (from 1994 to 2000), was intended for a four-wheel drive transmission.  A bitter epilogue Unfortunately, this project, like that of the beautiful 75 Coupé presented the same year, effectively marked the end of the brand's activity, even if in Geneva, the leaders of the MG Rover group even risked announcing that the TCV would soon be the first model of a new range arriving in 2004, which never happened.   Sources said the project also presented critical "legal" issues, as Ford, which bought Land Rover from BMW in 2000, allegedly banned MG Rover from building all-terrain vehicles to avoid confusion and overlap with the brand. .  For the same reason, in 2005, after the bankruptcy of MG Rover, the American giant rushed to acquire the exploitation rights of the Rover brand in order to prevent anyone from using it, thus decreeing its permanent abolition.

The TCV line was distinguished, however, by the abundance of edges and flat surfaces which hinted at the future stylistic orientation of the brand. The main feature of the car was therefore quite different: versatility, to which the company valued so much that at the Rover stand in Geneva the concept was presented with a washing machine placed in the trunk to show how spacious it was .

The interior has, in fact, been designed with a special floor that can be lowered at the rear to optimize volume and facilitate loading, while all seats can be folded except the driver's seat.

This freed up a space 3 meters long and an area comparable to that of a small van. It is also possible to install fixed sofas and various other accessories at fixing points in the floor, thus transforming the cabin into a living room.

Under the hood, a V6

Whenever we hear a leader admit that some role model literally saved their company's life, we can't help but think of all the times things haven't gone so well.  Could historic brands that more or less recently disappeared, such as Rover, a true British icon with more than 100 years of history, could have been saved by a single car? If the answer is yes, then thinking back to the years when the British brand went out of business, this car should be an SUV . In fact, shortly before the shutdown, Rover had studied one, presented in prototype form at the 2002 Geneva Motor Show under the name TCV .  Born to be versatile TCV stood for  Tourer Concept Vehicle , nothing very original to us today, but back then that's what the first SUVs looked like. The design was the work of Peter Stevens  who, after working on famous models such as the McLaren F1 and the latest evolution of the Lotus Esprit, had become the style director of Rover, designing the latest models of the 25 and the 45 to the all-new 75, and its sporty MG variants.  The TCV line was distinguished, however, by the abundance of edges and flat surfaces which hinted at the future stylistic orientation of the brand. The main feature of the car was therefore quite different: versatility, to which the company valued so much that at the Rover stand in Geneva the concept was presented with a washing machine placed in the trunk to show how spacious it was .  The interior has, in fact, been designed with a special floor that can be lowered at the rear to optimize volume and facilitate loading, while all seats can be folded except the driver's seat.  This freed up a space 3 meters long and an area comparable to that of a small van. It is also possible to install fixed sofas and various other accessories at fixing points in the floor, thus transforming the cabin into a living room.  Under the hood, a V6 The mechanics were taken from production models and were not so revolutionary. It was based on the engine of the 75 with the V6 2.5 L.  The chassis of the 75, developed during the period when Rover was owned by BMW (from 1994 to 2000), was intended for a four-wheel drive transmission.  A bitter epilogue Unfortunately, this project, like that of the beautiful 75 Coupé presented the same year, effectively marked the end of the brand's activity, even if in Geneva, the leaders of the MG Rover group even risked announcing that the TCV would soon be the first model of a new range arriving in 2004, which never happened.   Sources said the project also presented critical "legal" issues, as Ford, which bought Land Rover from BMW in 2000, allegedly banned MG Rover from building all-terrain vehicles to avoid confusion and overlap with the brand. .  For the same reason, in 2005, after the bankruptcy of MG Rover, the American giant rushed to acquire the exploitation rights of the Rover brand in order to prevent anyone from using it, thus decreeing its permanent abolition.

The mechanics were taken from production models and were not so revolutionary. It was based on the engine of the 75 with the V6 2.5 L.  The chassis of the 75, developed during the period when Rover was owned by BMW (from 1994 to 2000), was intended for a four-wheel drive transmission.

A bitter epilogue

Unfortunately, this project, like that of the beautiful 75 Coupé presented the same year, effectively marked the end of the brand's activity, even if in Geneva, the leaders of the MG Rover group even risked announcing that the TCV would soon be the first model of a new range arriving in 2004, which never happened. 

Whenever we hear a leader admit that some role model literally saved their company's life, we can't help but think of all the times things haven't gone so well.  Could historic brands that more or less recently disappeared, such as Rover, a true British icon with more than 100 years of history, could have been saved by a single car? If the answer is yes, then thinking back to the years when the British brand went out of business, this car should be an SUV . In fact, shortly before the shutdown, Rover had studied one, presented in prototype form at the 2002 Geneva Motor Show under the name TCV .  Born to be versatile TCV stood for  Tourer Concept Vehicle , nothing very original to us today, but back then that's what the first SUVs looked like. The design was the work of Peter Stevens  who, after working on famous models such as the McLaren F1 and the latest evolution of the Lotus Esprit, had become the style director of Rover, designing the latest models of the 25 and the 45 to the all-new 75, and its sporty MG variants.  The TCV line was distinguished, however, by the abundance of edges and flat surfaces which hinted at the future stylistic orientation of the brand. The main feature of the car was therefore quite different: versatility, to which the company valued so much that at the Rover stand in Geneva the concept was presented with a washing machine placed in the trunk to show how spacious it was .  The interior has, in fact, been designed with a special floor that can be lowered at the rear to optimize volume and facilitate loading, while all seats can be folded except the driver's seat.  This freed up a space 3 meters long and an area comparable to that of a small van. It is also possible to install fixed sofas and various other accessories at fixing points in the floor, thus transforming the cabin into a living room.  Under the hood, a V6 The mechanics were taken from production models and were not so revolutionary. It was based on the engine of the 75 with the V6 2.5 L.  The chassis of the 75, developed during the period when Rover was owned by BMW (from 1994 to 2000), was intended for a four-wheel drive transmission.  A bitter epilogue Unfortunately, this project, like that of the beautiful 75 Coupé presented the same year, effectively marked the end of the brand's activity, even if in Geneva, the leaders of the MG Rover group even risked announcing that the TCV would soon be the first model of a new range arriving in 2004, which never happened.   Sources said the project also presented critical "legal" issues, as Ford, which bought Land Rover from BMW in 2000, allegedly banned MG Rover from building all-terrain vehicles to avoid confusion and overlap with the brand. .  For the same reason, in 2005, after the bankruptcy of MG Rover, the American giant rushed to acquire the exploitation rights of the Rover brand in order to prevent anyone from using it, thus decreeing its permanent abolition.

Sources said the project also presented critical "legal" issues, as Ford, which bought Land Rover from BMW in 2000, allegedly banned MG Rover from building all-terrain vehicles to avoid confusion and overlap with the brand. .

For the same reason, in 2005, after the bankruptcy of MG Rover, the American giant rushed to acquire the exploitation rights of the Rover brand in order to prevent anyone from using it, thus decreeing its permanent abolition.

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