Cop26, Toyota: Many countries are not yet ready for a complete switch to electric

Toyota is among the automakers that have not accepted COP26's commitment to block sales and production of internal combustion engine vehicles by 2040. In an interview with Reuters , the Japanese manufacturer revealed the reasons why has decided not to be part of this group.  A Toyota spokesperson said “ where the energy and infrastructure for charging, economic conditions and customer availability exist, we are ready to accelerate and support the transition with appropriate zero-emission vehicles. However, in many areas of the world, such as Asia, Africa, the Middle East, there is still no suitable operating environment to promote zero-emission transport. We think it will take longer to make progress. Therefore, it is difficult for us to commit ourselves to the joint declaration now ”.  As reported in an article published in the past few hours, the commitment of Co26 has been confirmed for now by six car manufacturers: General Motors (GM), Ford , Volvo , Mercedes , Jaguar Land Rover and BYD . On the contrary, several other equally important brands are missing such as Stellantis, Volkswagen, BMW, Renault, Nissan, Honda, Hyundai-Kia and Toyota. In addition to auto manufacturers, countries like the United States, China, Germany, Italy , France and Spain have also said no.  One of the main reasons why Toyota has not joined is the substantial difference in sales in the various countries. In 2020, there was strong growth in registrations in Europe, China and the United States. The same thing, however, cannot be said for South America and Africa where interest is even lower. The strong disparity between the various geographical areas was the reason why Volkswagen also decided not to join.  The statements made by the executives of Volkswagen, BMW and Daimler For CEO Herbert Diess, it would make more sense to use synthetic fuel in Latin America starting in 2035 rather than focusing entirely on electric cars. Diess also stated that it is not possible to completely abandon internal combustion engines by 2030 as it would be difficult to meet the large demand for batteries coming from the 100% electric mobility sector and open new mines from which to extract the raw materials necessary for production. .  “ This is why I believe that the objectives of the European Union are already extremely ambitious in themselves. I don't think we can hit the throttle, ”Diess said. Even Oliver Zipse , CEO of BMW, has expressed its own opinion on the matter, saying: " We have signed the agreement and do not intend to do so, because, under present conditions, will be harmful to the climate. There is too much myopia and I can not help but strongly warn against it ”.  According to BMW's number one, in many cities it will be impossible to guarantee 100% clean electricity and the charging networks will be insufficient, so motorists will continue to use thermal cars. Hence, the German automaker will continue to work on cars with petrol and diesel engines alongside full electric and plug-in hybrids. Even Ola Kallenius , CEO of Daimler, expressed skepticism about the targets envisaged by the agreement, despite having signed up.

Toyota is among the automakers that have not accepted COP26's commitment to block sales and production of internal combustion engine vehicles by 2040. In an interview with Reuters , the Japanese manufacturer revealed the reasons why has decided not to be part of this group.

A Toyota spokesperson said “ where the energy and infrastructure for charging, economic conditions and customer availability exist, we are ready to accelerate and support the transition with appropriate zero-emission vehicles. However, in many areas of the world, such as Asia, Africa, the Middle East, there is still no suitable operating environment to promote zero-emission transport. We think it will take longer to make progress. Therefore, it is difficult for us to commit ourselves to the joint declaration now ”.

As reported in an article published in the past few hours, the commitment of Co26 has been confirmed for now by six car manufacturers: General Motors (GM), Ford , Volvo , Mercedes , Jaguar Land Rover and BYD . On the contrary, several other equally important brands are missing such as Stellantis, Volkswagen, BMW, Renault, Nissan, Honda, Hyundai-Kia and Toyota. In addition to auto manufacturers, countries like the United States, China, Germany, Italy , France and Spain have also said no.

One of the main reasons why Toyota has not joined is the substantial difference in sales in the various countries. In 2020, there was strong growth in registrations in Europe, China and the United States. The same thing, however, cannot be said for South America and Africa where interest is even lower. The strong disparity between the various geographical areas was the reason why Volkswagen also decided not to join.

The statements made by the executives of Volkswagen, BMW and Daimler

For CEO Herbert Diess, it would make more sense to use synthetic fuel in Latin America starting in 2035 rather than focusing entirely on electric cars. Diess also stated that it is not possible to completely abandon internal combustion engines by 2030 as it would be difficult to meet the large demand for batteries coming from the 100% electric mobility sector and open new mines from which to extract the raw materials necessary for production. .

“ This is why I believe that the objectives of the European Union are already extremely ambitious in themselves. I don't think we can hit the throttle, ”Diess said. Even Oliver Zipse , CEO of BMW, has expressed its own opinion on the matter, saying: " We have signed the agreement and do not intend to do so, because, under present conditions, will be harmful to the climate. There is too much myopia and I can not help but strongly warn against it ”.

According to BMW's number one, in many cities it will be impossible to guarantee 100% clean electricity and the charging networks will be insufficient, so motorists will continue to use thermal cars. Hence, the German automaker will continue to work on cars with petrol and diesel engines alongside full electric and plug-in hybrids. Even Ola Kallenius , CEO of Daimler, expressed skepticism about the targets envisaged by the agreement, despite having signed up.

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